Professional Practice

Therapy

I have worked as a psychotherapist and art therapist for over twenty-five years. My practice is open to people who speak French or English, from the age of six and up. I meet with people individually, or in small groups, for either short- or long-term therapy.

In 1995 I completed my Master’s Degree at the University of London, Goldsmith’s College, in Art Psychotherapy.

Since then, I’ve earned level 1 certification in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy for resolving trauma.

My approach to therapy distills elements which I have found most helpful and meaningful in my own life: chiefly, relational psychotherapy, the expressive arts, and sensorimotor therapy.  To me these approaches are intrinsically related — they are all a means to pay close, open-minded attention to the moment-to-moment play of our mind and body, our inside and our outside, ourselves and others, our conscious and unconscious, and to allow these to tell us who we are and what we need most.

I was a founder of the Women Recovering From Abuse Program (WRAP), where I have developed the program for 20 years. In 2019 I completed work as an art psychotherapist, trauma therapist, educator and supervisor within the Trauma Therapy Program of Women’s College Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto.  You can read an interview with me regarding trauma and its treatment, at the Women’s Health Matters site.

Advocacy and teaching

I think of therapy as only one way of sharing helpful perspectives with one another. I have found a number of ways of advocating for better social and individual lives: I am keen to build Art Hives, and I am involved in Critical Pedagogies in the Arts TherapiesVisual Thinking Strategies and Teaching for Transformation are approaches that are dear to me.

As an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, I teach and supervise interdisciplinary health professions, medical students and residents in psychiatry.

I’m specially interested in finding ways to bring the insights of art-making and art-looking to learners and practitioners.  One of the ways i offer a taste of this is within U of T’s Health, Arts and Humanities Program, where I offer a series of seminars: “Psychotherapy: Using Image and Imagination”, and “Telling Trauma through Art”.

“The Visible Curriculum”, (a chapter in Health Humanities in Postgraduate Medical Education, co-written with Shelley Wall) advances the uses of art-viewing and art-making to shape better doctors.

In 2011 I created the SpeakART group, an exceptional clinical-cultural collaboration between the Trauma Therapy Program and the Art Gallery of Ontario. I co-produced the Art Not Violence project, which includes an online gallery of artwork made in the context of trauma therapy.

In addition to my private practice I have worked in settings such as an addictions treatment clinic, a transcultural therapy centre, a program for survivors of sexual assault and trauma, and a refugee reception centre. I maintain an active interest in teaching, in consulting, and in supervising colleagues and students in the mental health field, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed a stint of teaching at Metafora, within the University of Barcelona.

Earlier on, I served as assistant editor at C Magazine, as a translator, and as an art and language teacher.